Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Using Ubuntu's Gnome configuration editor

Gnome configuration editor

I posted recently about the fact that some of Ubuntu's installed applications are not available in the menus after a default install. One such useful application is the Gnome Configuration Editor. This utility allows you to change many of the settings that affect the various applications that come with Ubuntu. Here's how to enable it :

1. Click on System>Administration>Preferences>Main Menu
2. Click on the System Tools category.
3. Check the box beside Configuration Editor
4. Click on Close.
5. You can now run the Configuration Editor from Applications>System Tools>Configuration Editor.

WARNING - There's a reason this program wasn't enabled by default. You could do some serious damage to your Ubuntu or its applications by indiscriminately changing values in the Configuration Editor - so don't change something unless your pretty sure what the outcome is going to be. It might be a good idea to back up all of your configuration files before using this if you're not sure about something. You could do this by backing up your home/username/.gconfig directory (to see this directory, you'll have to click on View>Show Hidden Files) in the File Browser (Nautilus).

What next?
If you have a problem or question, leave a comment, I'll be glad to help. I'm still new at Ubuntu, too - but it may be that I've already been where you're at.
For more Ubuntu tips, tricks and software, subscribe to my feed. Or use the Bookmark button below to find your way back.

Gnome configuration editor

Changinng the auto hide and unhide delays value for Gnome panels

An example of something that can be changed using the Configuration Editor is the auto-hide delay for your Gnome panel(s). I have my bottom panel set to auto-hide, but leave the top panel visible all the time. Only thing is, it takes to long for the bottom panel to hide and unhide. To change this, run the Configuration Editor, navigate to apps>panel>toplevels> bottom_panel_screen0 (for the default screen). Now change the hide_delay and unhide_delay values to 100 or 250, or whatever suits you (value is in milliseconds). You can also un-check enable_animations if you want immediate response. Now, just close the editor, logout and log back in and the new value should be in effect.

What next?
If you have a problem or question, leave a comment, I'll be glad to help. I'm still new at Ubuntu, too - but it may be that I've already been where you're at.
For more Ubuntu tips, tricks and software, subscribe to my feed. Or use the Bookmark button below to find your way back.

2 comments:

denny said...

I am also new to Ubuntu . . . but am having one problem. I have a Dell laptop and a docking station. When the laptop is in the docking station, my external monitor does not work once the boot process gets to a certain point. It appears to me that it is a resolution issue, but I'm having trouble figuring out how to change the resolution.

Any help would be appreciation.

wrgb said...

Are you getting an error messsage? What is the last thing you see on the screen before it goes blank?

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